Exercise Music to Help You Work Out

The success of a workout session can depend on the music chosen. If you have the right exercise music, it will motivate you. If you don’t get it right, it can be a boring and pointless exercise and you will not get much out of the sessions. It is worth remembering that it is not just a matter of getting the beat right, but playing tracks that you like listening to. Playing the songs, you like can make the session fly by and seen much more fun whereas boring music will make it drag. Research took place in 2006 to come to this conclusion so it is based on fact and not just personal experience.

Starting Off

Before starting any period of exercise there should be a warm up session and there is no need to miss this part out of the sound track. This should be the easiest part of the session so should be accompanied by tracks that are a little slower, yet still motivating. Michael Jackson will be a good artist to use, with a song such as “Billie Jean” the perfect one to pick.

Often compilations of exercise music forget that the workout will not always be dance based, as many like to lift weights. Here the speed is very important as the movements must be careful and thought out. Trying to raise the bar too quickly can be dangerous and for this reason tracks with 130 – 140 beats per minute should be chosen. If you can listen to heavy bass, then that is the area to look to. A couple of tracks that have been seen to be effective is “Mercy” by Duffy and “Somebody Told Me” by The Killers.

Get the Right Beats Per Minute

It is if you are walking that you need to have the most stimulating songs although the speed that you will walk will determine the beat. 120 – 140 BPM is ideal for slower walkers, but if you will be going faster, so should the exercise music. Now it should be between 145 BPM and 160 BPM, although at this stage you will be running, so singing along probably won’t be an option. As you would imagine the Gnarls Barkley version of “Run” will be good, and when you first start you will possibly find that you end up “Speechless” and that track by Lady Gaga is also recommended.

By the time you are ready to cool down, you may find that you don’t care what the tracks are, but you still need to be careful about your actions. Your heart rate needs to come down to its normal rate at a steady pace. They should be relaxing songs, but not ones that will slow you down too quickly. It is about 120 BPM that you are looking for and this should be played for a good few minutes before you stop completely. If you work out how long you need it will help to make the tracks last that long. That way you know you have slowed down for long enough.

If you have worked hard, you may feel that your body is now “Under Pressure” and the David Bowie/Queen track of the same name will help calm you down. It would be fun to try and find other tracks that fit in with the stage you are at, so at this point you could also try “Just like Fire” by Pink as that may be how you are feeling. Failing that, Mariah Carey’s “Almost Home” could be appropriate. If you have gone too far “Help” by the Beatles may fit the bill, but that may be a little too lively for this stage of the session.